franklanguage (franklanguage) wrote,
franklanguage
franklanguage

July Jamboree at Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary

It was a great time; I had never been to WFAS before, even though I've been sponsoring animals there for a few years. The sanctuary hosts several annual festivals, including their ThanksLiving feast, where they feed the turkeys instead of eating them. (The turkeys get to eat first!)


IMG_3222
So, here we are...


IMG_3216
And here's the main barn and visitor center…


How could you say no to a face like this?
How could you say no to a face like this?

The goats could tell I had—dog—treats in my pockets—which happened to be vegan—and they were nuzzling me and hitting me up through the fence. Yeah; they're a lot like dogs.

Steers (not bulls)
Steers (not bulls)

The animals at the farm are all rescued, many from horrific conditions. Many are friendly, but a lot are kept behind electrified fences. "To keep the bears out," says one person at the farm. The red wire at the top of the fence is turned on at night—yes, to keep the bears out and the cattle in.



This pig is nobody's fool
This pig is nobody's fool

One woman was surprised that pigs are so smart. "Are they as smart as dogs?" she asked.

"Smarter," I said. I could easily see being friends with a pig.

IMG_3193 IMG_3143
A kid-friendly gathering

This was a very kid-friendly gathering; turkeys roamed all over and the kids were petting and feeding them.

IMG_3183 IMG_3178
As many roosters as hens

There are probably as many roosters as hens at the sanctuary, because what a lot of people don't realize is that in the egg—and poultry—industry, most males are separated and discarded as chicks. At a lot of farms, they're separated out and are sent down a chute and ground up—or sometimes they're just buried alive. Not only are they not profitable to raise for meat, but you don't need a lot of roosters to fertilize a flock of laying hens.

So I saw a lot of roosters with beautiful plumage that day, preening and strutting their stuff.

This kid was really good, by the way
This kid was really good, by the way

There were a lot of performers in the main barn, and this kid, who must have been around 10, was really good—exuberant and talented. Get 'em started young.

Singing to the turkey
Singing to the turkey

Of course, the best thing about this day was going up to Woodstock to be with the farm animals, and they seemed happy enough to have us there.

Joy Askew and Friends
Joy Askew and Friends

Joy Askew is a longtime vegan and a longtime volunteer at the sanctuary. It doesn't hurt that she's a great and talented performer and songwriter, either.

Lauren and friend
Lauren and friend

Lauren V., whom I know from the 4th Street Food Co-op in the city, is a great musician—who humbly refers to herself as a "hopeful musician."

Turkey
Turkey

There are a lot of turkeys at the farm, all saved from the carving knife—or worse.

All the food was vegan IMG_3149

All the food served was vegan! It was great to see families chowing down on veggie dogs and veganized picnic food; of course, it was all delicious and even the marshmallows were toast-able.

I can't wait to go back!

This entry was originally posted at http://franklanguage.dreamwidth.org/163055.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Tags: farm, sanctuary, woodstock
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

  • 4 comments